Author Topic: FM Radio station in WY - Who wants to run one?  (Read 22194 times)

Offline citizen_142002

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Re: FM Radio station in WY - Who wants to run one?
« Reply #45 on: April 19, 2009, 06:21:58 PM »
As a radio host myself, I may be biased, but I think that radio is a great way to spread the message of liberty. Free Minds Radio also started as a podcast, and now we're on five stations plus the internet.

www.freemindsradio.com

Free Talk Live got it's start with a single radio station, and now they're on over 40 stations. If you have the desire to start a pro-liberty program, start up a podcast or try to get a show on a local Wyoming station. You've gotta start somewhere and the important thing is producing some kind of content so that you can build up your program.

Offline MichaelNotMike

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Re: FM Radio station in WY - Who wants to run one?
« Reply #46 on: May 11, 2009, 09:13:47 AM »
I think Andrew has a good idea starting with a podcast. ...

Yup.

If anyone wants a quick primer, I can help. I know a lot about audio recording, gear, editing, podcasting, hosting, etc.

MWD
Anti-war, pro-gun.

Offline KDus

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Re: FM Radio station in WY - Who wants to run one?
« Reply #47 on: June 25, 2009, 07:10:52 PM »
I currently run a station out of my garage, and work for 2 licensed stations in Los Angeles. I looked into Low Power licenses many years ago and found it was just a scam to pacify the masses. Actually, getting licensed was still extreemly expensive.
Since then, I've realized that applying for a license would legitimize the FCC. It would be cheaper to act like free people, and deal with a fine, should one be imposed.

I use the libertyradionetwork feed for much of my programming. When I move to WY, I hope to start a show, "Free WY Live"

I've spent 15 years in and around commercial radio. I can tell you that programming and putting a signal on the air, are the easiest tasks.
Government fails.

Offline anarchir

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Re: FM Radio station in WY - Who wants to run one?
« Reply #48 on: September 07, 2009, 10:16:55 PM »
So, what I'm hearing from you and on bbs.freetalklive.com and from FTL...is that getting together the materials and broadcasting and finding content are easy, the hard part is getting a high enough antenna and paying for more broadcasting power?

Is it possible to borrow the use of something tall to broadcast? Is it possible to run a cable several blocks to get to higher ground?
If the higher object (say, a tower) is broadcasting its own signal, would there be interference? Would the antenna be spotted if it were sitting up somewhere high or is it just  a wire?

                                       Thanks for the help,
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Offline LibertyJunkie

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Re: FM Radio station in WY - Who wants to run one?
« Reply #49 on: September 08, 2009, 08:24:57 AM »
For my understanding, the FCC permits that are the hard part or should I say, the expensive part.  If you want to go below there radar, you could only put out enough ?(amps or watts or whatever they call em) to cover a 4 mile radius, I think you would need to put it high up on a building to reach the full 4 miles. Its a few thousand bucks for the equipment, which really isnt that bad. We really want to set one up but cant afford it at the moment.

Offline KDus

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Re: FM Radio station in WY - Who wants to run one?
« Reply #50 on: October 02, 2009, 01:01:03 AM »
The "legal" power has nothing to do with antenna height. There is a limit on signal level at a given distance. You can use up to 100mw to achieve that level.
Getting on a real broadcast tower is pointless unless the channel you use is far away from the high power broadcasters. 91.1 vs. 100.7 .....
Near the tower, a radio won't hear your small signal against the big one.
The more signal you use, the more risk you take.
Getting your antenna on a tall building is good for distance but power is needed for what we call penetration. Height is good up to a point. If you don't have enough power to get through walls, there's not much point.
I've gotten 15 miles on just a few watts. It was usable because the highway was line of site to the house. In town, the signal was terrible.
Government fails.

Offline Vince

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Re: FM Radio station in WY - Who wants to run one?
« Reply #51 on: October 02, 2009, 02:24:08 PM »
Pardon me if this question seems naive but with the availability of internet access, doesn't that negate the old fashioned "brick and mortar" radio station (or antenna for that matter ;) )?

I mean, why not broadcast exclusively through the net with posted scheduling times, guest lists, etc?

Or is it that there is a need to capture the ears of people surfing the radio waves while they drive?

Just curious.
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Offline KDus

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Re: FM Radio station in WY - Who wants to run one?
« Reply #52 on: November 06, 2009, 06:33:23 PM »
Radio still has very high market penetration, but:
Yes, radio is changing. The government sponsored monopoly that the NAB has been enjoying, is disolving now that the free market is finding ways to deliver what consumers want without paying the troll at the bridge.
I'm seeing it where I work. Internet and "non-traditional" revenue is becoming more and more important. Many of us agree that we're seeing the last hurrah of radio as we've known it, and it will come full circle, to be the local and immediate source of news and community media. Commercial radio is done.
I'm starting to think of radio as a rotating billboard. Only new music will have any appeal. The rest of the content can only be used to get people to wait through commercials, which necessarily will get shorter and shorter.
I broadcast the stream from libertyradionetwork.
I want listeners to hear something that motivates them to visit websites or try out liberty oriented pod-casts. Aside from that, only old-timers and non-tech-savy, listeners will bother to sit through the shows.
Government fails.